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Central Italy, between legends and earthquakes

Central Italy, between legends and earthquakes

Central Italy devastated by an earthquake which, in terms of intensity, was no longer registered since 1980 (when an earthquake of the same magnitude, 6.5 Richter, devastated the Irpinia causing about 3 thousand victims) and which seems to be the continuation of last August’s event. Just figure that according to Ncr and the National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology have detected, through radar images of Copernicus’ (the European Earth Observation Programme) Sentinel-1 constellation’s sensors, a ground deformation caused by October 30th earthquake of maximum 28 inch on an area which covers about 81 square miles.

Central Italy, between legends and earthquakes

The fairy cave

Central Italy has always been a land full of mysteries and legends, some of which pretty dark. Just beneath the top of Monte Sibilla, at a 2,150 meters above sea level, there is a cave also known as “fairy cave”, that since the Middle Ages was so well-known to be represented even in some frescoes inside the Vatican Museum.

Central Italy, between legends and earthquakes

According to a legend, made famous by the cavalier novel “Il Guerin Meschino”, written around 1.430 by Andrea da Barberino, it was the passage to the nether realm of the Sibilla Queen. It was a fairy kingdom, where enchanting creatures lived in a kind of neverending party, except to turn themselves one day a week into horrible monsters.

Pilato’s lake

Nearby, on the top of Monte Vettore, at around 2,000 meters above sea level, the “Pilato’s lake” (that some call “the lake with glasses”), is also considered a magical and mystery place, whose waters would hid out the body of Pontius Pilati, sentenced to death by emperor Tiberius. Once Killed, his body tied in a sack would be loaded on a chariot pulled by buffaloes left free to wandering around and finally went down in the lake falling from the nearby Redentore’s top.

Central Italy, between legends and earthquakes

Considered for this reason a good place in which hold witches and necromancers sessions, in Middle Ages was forbidden access to the lake by religious authority who built drywall to avoid that people reached its waters and installed a gallows at principle of valley, as an eternal reminder. For some, furthermore, this lake was the “Tartarus lake”, the communication port between the world of the living and the world of the dead (that some other legends put in Campania, near Pozzuoli, nearby the famous “Cumaean Sibyl’s cave”).

Tags: Myths